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The Home Front: A breath of fresh air

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The first thing to consider when choosing a home or building a home is where the sun rises and sets, says Ross Bonetti, founder of Vancouver’s Livingspace Interiors and Livingspace Homes, as this will determine how much natural light your home will have Has.

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Rebecca Keillor Large windows and an open concept design are the best way to create the feeling of fresh air indoors. Large windows and an open concept design are the best way to create the feeling of fresh air indoors. Photo courtesy of Livingspace /.jpg

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Being in the fresh air is as good as it gets. It’s one of the best things to do in summer and outdoor fun. The way to convey that feeling indoors depends on good design – interior, landscape and architecture.

The first thing to consider when choosing a home or building a home is where the sun rises and sets, says Ross Bonetti, founder of Vancouver’s Livingspace Interiors and Livingspace Homes, as this will determine how much natural light your home will have Has.

“A lot of people buy a house in the summer and never think about it. And then I realize, oh, I don’t get afternoon sun, the kind of sun most people want, ”he says.

In a climate like Vancouver, where it’s dark and gray year round, investing in big windows, skylights, and designing wide-open interiors help create that light, airy feel, says Bonetti. Window packages are the “big cost” when you choose open architecture or modern architecture on the west coast.

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Embrace light and air in our interior / exterior design Embrace light and air in our interior / exterior design Photo courtesy of Livingspace /.jpg

“The house I am currently designing and building has massive windows. Even in winter I don’t think I’ll have many lights on; There is so much light in the house, ”he says.

In this design, they have taken the open concept to the next level, he says, with living, dining, kitchen, office and fitness rooms, all of which are open plan and flood the house with natural light.

“You can see the windows in the gym from the lower level. And on the other side of the house is our master bedroom. The light up here is amazing because it’s such an open space, ”he says.

Separating rooms from one another cuts off natural light, he says, and often people create dining rooms that are barely ever used – so you’re wasting the space you have.

Garden furniture is now just as comfortable as indoor furniture. ”

“We see it very, big, massive houses that are all these little rooms in the end,” he says.

Just as rooms blur into one another, furniture categories also blur, says Bonetti and decides to equip his house with furniture by the European designer Paola Lenti, whose outdoor collection also works well indoors.

“Garden furniture is now just as comfortable as indoor furniture,” he says.

You can really play with the element of light in your outdoor areas, says Reinier Van de Poll of Van de Poll Gardens, by choosing plants that change color when the breeze hits them – and whose leaves turn. Trees like honey locus, revered grasses, and some narrow poplars are good examples, he says.

“These types of trees and grasses are remarkably different and play wonderfully with the light and shade in the garden,” says Van de Poll.

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For those who love light and airy environments, planting lots of white flowers is an interesting gardening concept, he says.

“They really shine at night. If you happen to have a full moon or have good garden lighting, these white flowers will almost shine in the garden. Some English designers only created white gardens, ”he says.

A common request from Van de Poll that he frequently receives from customers is to plant in their backyards for privacy. But, he says, if he does this and plants a 12 foot hedge around their yard it will feel private, but they’ll likely hate it for feeling walled in – the opposite of an airy environment.

A better option, he says, is to have some well-placed trees.

“Your garden will feel bigger, you will get a sense of privacy and your sense of space and air will feel bigger,” says Van de Poll.

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Robert Dunfee