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An Algorithm Transforms Images Into Sound-Absorbing Wall Art

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We have seen digital artists and programmers develop methods that allow anyone to convert images into sound. Scanlines is a new algorithmic system developed by Turf Design that takes the concept to another level, one that adds a tactile element and translates each image into sound absorbing PET felt sheets that are presented as dimensional wall art.

The Secret Sauce is TURF’s proprietary algorithm, a system programmed to measure the intensity of shades of color within an image and convert it to a quantified degree of depth, which in turn is used to convert TURF’s acoustic PET felt into to cut different depths. As the name suggests, the resulting panel art has an aesthetic reminiscent of the scan lines of a cathode ray tube (CRT) television program – a two-dimensional panel rendered with line-by-line dimensionality.

TURF is aimed at designers and architects and offers scanlines in every combination of 9 mm and 3 mm PET felt sheet material with 30 colors to choose from.

The resulting work of art is not only aesthetic, because the combination of the acoustic properties of PET felt and the different depths and widths of “scan lines” act as a sound-absorbing surface that reduces echo and reverberation – artistic acoustics.

“We know that architects and designers have different problems when developing spaces – be it a spatial, visual or acoustic problem,” says Rob Perri, CEO of TURF. “TURF is working on building systems that solve all of this at the same time – in the truest sense of the word Scanlines reveals the art of acoustics and our endeavor to create unparalleled solutions. The panels look amazing, absorb unwanted noises and enlarge the overall perceived space. “

TURF says “almost any type of image” can be used to create panels, with the maximum allowable height being 119 “high, 47.5” wide, and 12 mm thick. Acoustically, Scanlines panels offer a noise reduction coefficient value of 0.35, which means that 35% of the sound energy that comes into contact with the panel is absorbed and not reflected.

While these contract-quality panels are intended for commercial and business use, there is also the option of using such technological works of art to soften echoes in a living area, particularly in home offices or other creative studio spaces where this “wall of sound” – Panels could silence annoying echoes.

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Robert Dunfee